Dating more than one person ettequette

By the Victorian era, etiquette had developed into an exceptionally complicated system of rules, governing everything from the proper method for writing letters and using cutlery to the minutely regulated interactions between different classes and gender.Manners are described as good or bad to indicate whether or not a behavior is socially acceptable.In my mind there is nothing so illiberal, and so ill-bred, as audible laughter.

They enable human ‘ultrasociality’ argued that manners arose as a product of group living and persist as a way of maintaining social order.

He theorized that manners proliferated during the Renaissance in response to the development of the ‘absolute state’ – the progression from small group living to the centralization of power by the state.

Shaftesbury defined politeness as the art of being pleasing in company: Periodicals, such as The Spectator, founded as a daily publication by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele in 1711, gave regular advice to its readers on how to conform to the etiquette required of a polite gentleman.

Its stated goal was "to enliven morality with wit, and to temper wit with morality...

Petersen and Lupton argue that manners helped reduce the boundaries between the public sphere and the private sphere and gave rise to “a highly reflective self, a self who monitors his or her behavior with due regard for others with whom he or she interacts socially.” They explain that; “The public behavior of individuals came to signify their social standing, a means of presenting the self and of evaluating others and thus the control of the outward self was vital.” From this perspective, manners are seen not just as a means of displaying one’s social status, but also as a means of maintaining social boundaries relative to class and identity.

Pierre Bourdieu’s notion of ‘habitus’ can also contribute to the understanding of manners.

In the 3rd millennium BC, Ptahhotep wrote The Maxims of Ptahhotep.

The Maxims were conformist precepts extolling such civil virtues as truthfulness, self-control and kindness towards one's fellow beings.

Chesterfield epitomised the restraint of polite 18th-century society, writing, for instance, in 1748: I would heartily wish that you may often be seen to smile, but never heard to laugh while you live.

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