Dating more than one person ettequette

Shaftesbury defined politeness as the art of being pleasing in company: Periodicals, such as The Spectator, founded as a daily publication by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele in 1711, gave regular advice to its readers on how to conform to the etiquette required of a polite gentleman.

Periodicals, including The Tatler and The Spectator, infused politeness into English coffeehouse conversation, as their explicit purpose lay in the reformation of English manners and morals.

The letters were first published by his son's widow Eugenia Stanhope in 1774.

Every culture adheres to a different set of manners, although a lot of manners are cross-culturally common.

Manners are a subset of social norms which are informally enforced through self-regulation and social policing and publicly performed.

By the Victorian era, etiquette had developed into an exceptionally complicated system of rules, governing everything from the proper method for writing letters and using cutlery to the minutely regulated interactions between different classes and gender.

Manners are described as good or bad to indicate whether or not a behavior is socially acceptable.It was against this awe-inspiring backdrop that Louis tamed the nobility and impressed foreign dignitaries, using entertainment, ceremony and a highly codified system of etiquette to assert his supremacy.” During the Enlightenment era, a self-conscious process of the imposition of polite norms and behaviours became a symbol of being a genteel member of the upper class.Upwardly mobile middle class bourgeoisie increasingly tried to identify themselves with the elite through their adopted artistic preferences and their standards of behaviour.Chesterfield epitomised the restraint of polite 18th-century society, writing, for instance, in 1748: I would heartily wish that you may often be seen to smile, but never heard to laugh while you live.Frequent and loud laughter is the characteristic of folly and ill-manners; it is the manner in which the mob express their silly joy at silly things; and they call it being merry.Stress is placed on the pursuit of justice, although it is conceded that it is a god's command that prevails in the end.

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