Dating at the upper larum

The Dii Consentes are sometimes seen as the Roman equivalent of the Greek Olympians.The meaning of Consentes is subject to interpretation, but is usually taken to mean that they form a council or consensus of deities.

Throughout the Empire, the deities of peoples in the provinces were given new theological interpretations in light of functions or attributes they shared with Roman deities.

An extensive alphabetical list follows a survey of theological groups as constructed by the Romans themselves.

The di indigetes were thought by Georg Wissowa to be Rome's indigenous deities, in contrast to the di novensides or novensiles, "newcomer gods".

No ancient source, however, poses this dichotomy, which is not generally accepted among scholars of the 21st century.

Even in invocations, which generally required precise naming, the Romans sometimes spoke of gods as groups or collectives rather than naming them as individuals.

Some groups, such as the Camenae and Parcae, were thought of as a limited number of individual deities, even though the number of these might not be given consistently in all periods and all texts.

The most familiar today are those the Romans identified with Greek counterparts (see interpretatio graeca), integrating Greek myths, iconography, and sometimes religious practices into Roman culture, including Latin literature, Roman art, and religious life as it was experienced throughout the Empire.

Many of the Romans' own gods remain obscure, known only by name and function, through inscriptions and texts that are often fragmentary.

The so-called "Venus in a bikini", from the house of Julia Felix, Pompeii, Italy actually depicts her Greek counterpart Aphrodite as she is about to untie her sandal, with a small Eros squatting beneath her left arm, 1st-century AD A lectisternium is a banquet for the gods, at which they appear as images seated on couches, as if present and participating.

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