Accommodating disabilities in classrooms

Part 1: A Quick Look at Terminology Part 2: Different Types of Supports and adaptations all mean the same thing.

The simple answer is: No, not completely, but yes, for the most part. ) People tend to use the terms interchangeably, to be sure, and we will do so here, for ease of reading, but distinctions can be made between the terms.

The IEP team must really work together to make sure that a child gets the supplementary aids and services that he or she needs to be successful.

It’s a pleasure to share some of that knowledge with you now.

For example: Jack is an 8th grade student who has learning disabilities in reading and writing.

It is not always obvious what adaptations, accommodations, or modifications would be beneficial for a particular student, or how changes to the curriculum, its presentation, the classroom setting, or student evaluation might be made.

This page is intended to help teachers and others find information that can guide them in making appropriate changes in the classroom based on what their students need.

Sometimes people get confused about what it means to have a .

Allowing a student who has trouble writing to give his answers orally is an example of an accommodation.means adapting, as appropriate to the needs of an eligible child under this part, the content, methodology, or delivery of instruction—(i) To address the unique needs of the child that result from the child’s disability; and(ii) To ensure access of the child to the general curriculum, so that the child can meet the educational standards within the jurisdiction of the public agency that apply to all children.[§300.39(b)(3)] Thus, special education involves adapting the “content, methodology, or delivery of instruction.” In fact, the special education field can take pride in the knowledge base and expertise it’s developed in the past 30-plus years of individualizing instruction to meet the needs of students with disabilities.Much more can be said about these important supports and services.Visit our special article on Supplementary Aids and Services to find out more.For many students with disabilities—and for many without—the key to success in the classroom lies in having appropriate adaptations, accommodations, and modifications made to the instruction and other classroom activities.

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