100 rules to dating

It was him that was the star, he was much of the reason I was drawn to the show, and it was his impeccable comic delivery that was able to elicit a laugh-out-loud response.

In the wake of the tragedy, the show attempted what at the time might have been unthinkable.

His bratty nephew role here is just Spade doing his same old tired shtick.

I've criticized ABC in the past for recklessly mismanaging its shows for years - sending great shows on the chopping block far too soon - but in this case they and the "Rules" show-runners did exactly the right thing.

In fact, "breaking some marriage 'rules' may be the best thing you can do for your relationship," says Barbara Bartlein, RN, MSW, psychotherapist and author of one come from?

Turns out, it may go as far back as the Bible, which advises not letting the sun go down on your anger.

Making your relationship top priority is better not just for you, but for your children, who need to see you in charge and who feel safer and more secure with parents who have a loving relationship. One partner may be a toss-and-turner, or one may hit the hay early while the other keeps a reading light burning till the wee hours.

"Create couple-only time during which you do not discuss bills or children, where you do fun activities and enjoy each other's company." The kids'll be all right. So if one of you occasionally decamps to the guest room, don't sweat it.

"That invites comparisons, and when you compare, someone comes up short." The bottom line: You need to be polite and caring when it comes to your partner's feelings. One problem with this rule is that you and your spouse may not have the same definition of a great getaway (you like to ski, he's a beach bum). Lombardo, is the belief "that you have to be each other's likely to split.

You need to find ways to fight healthily and productively (without blaming, name-calling and the like), but that said, being committed to respectfully airing out conflicts is a far better rule than "keep your mouth shut." 5. "So often, I see couples who have put their relationship on hold in order to be good parents," says Dr. But those couples, she says, have it exactly backward. It's a myth that couples always sleep better and more cozily together than apart.

);spend every night in the same bed; and never, ever be bored. These and other so-called "rules" for marriage need some serious debunking.

And it's not just because rules your mother may have passed on are outdated; some may be downright damaging.

But trying to work through a problem when you're tired and stressed won't get you anywhere, says Elizabeth Lombardo, Ph D, psychologist and author of 2. In marriage, no-holds-barred honesty is not always the best policy.

Tags: , ,